January 30, 2015

Cerebral Palsy in the News: Woman With CP Writes 60,000 Word Novel With Left Foot

When Hu Huiyuan was born, she was not expected to live more than a few days. She survived these odds, and ten months later, her parents were told that she had cerebral palsy, according an article recently posted by the Daily Mail. The 21-year-old Chinese woman's movements are so limited by CP that she is only able to control her head and her left foot properly. However, this condition has not stopped Hu, who taught herself to read and write and to type on a keyboard with her foot, ultimately leading her to create a 60,000-word novel.

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January 16, 2015

Cerebral Palsy and Its Different Forms, Part II

Last week, we discussed the various different kinds of cerebral palsy (CP), a condition resulting from injuries to a child's brain while in the womb or at birth. The four main types of CP, spastic cerebral palsy, dyskinetic cerebral palsy, ataxic cerebral palsy, and mixed cerebral palsy, vary in the different parts of the body they affect and also how they affect the body. While we explained spastic and dyskinetic cerebral palsy in depth last week, this week, we delve into the characteristics of ataxic and mixed cerebral palsy.

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January 8, 2015

Cerebral Palsy and Its Different Forms, Part I

Cerebral palsy (CP), a condition resulting from injuries to a child's brain while in the womb or at birth, is often referred to simply as "cerebral palsy." However, CP can be divided into various different types, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). There are four main types of CP, which we have mentioned in a prior post and discuss in more detail here: spastic cerebral palsy, dyskinetic cerebral palsy, ataxic cerebral palsy, and mixed cerebral palsy. In this post, we will discuss the first two types: spastic cerebral palsy and dyskinetic cerebral palsy.


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January 2, 2015

"Voir Dire is Scary (This is the Truth)": Nelson Tyrone Published in Verdict Magazine, Part II

Last month, we announced that Verdict Magazine, journal for the Georgia Trial Lawyers Association, had published an article written by Nelson Tyrone of Tyrone Law Firm. That post summarized the first half of the article, which discusses the challenges attorneys face during voir dire, the process by which potential jurors for a trial are selected. Today, we explain the second half of the article.

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December 23, 2014

Tyrone Law Firm Wins $13.9 Million Verdict in Georgia Birth Injury Case, Part II

Last week, we announced that the Georgia Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a $13.9 million medical malpractice verdict in a case where the plaintiff was represented by Tyrone Law Firm at trial. The complaint, brought by Melissa Dempsey for injuries that her daughter, Kailey, sustained during her birth in 2002, alleged that Kailey suffers from permanent mental and physical disabilities including cerebral palsy and mental retardation due to traumatic brain injury at birth, caused directly by the attending nurses' negligence during the birth. This week, we delve a little deeper into the Court's ruling and the reasoning behind its conclusion.

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December 20, 2014

Tyrone Law Firm Wins $13.9 Million Verdict in Georgia Birth Injury Case, Part I

Earlier this month, the Georgia Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a $13.9 million medical malpractice verdict in a case where the plaintiff was represented by Tyrone Law Firm. The Court ruled in favor of the plaintiff, Melissa Dempsey, for injuries that her daughter, Kailey, sustained during her birth in 2002.

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December 16, 2014

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD, CRPS Type 1) Support: Hope Over Pain

A few weeks ago, we posted about several different support groups that exist for those suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), also known as complex regional pain syndrome type 1, a condition that causes severe, chronic pain and has no known cure. Recently, we learned of another, Hope Over Pain, that may be of use to those seeking communal support for coping with RSD.

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December 12, 2014

"Voir Dire is Scary (This is the Truth)": Nelson Tyrone Published in Verdict Magazine, Part I

In this year's fall edition of Verdict Magazine, the journal for the Georgia Trial Lawyers Association, Nelson Tyrone of Tyrone Law firm wrote and published an article about the challenges of voir dire, the process by which potential jurors are questioned on various matters before being chosen to sit on a jury for trial.

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December 4, 2014

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (CRPS Type 1): Stories of Managing Pain

Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), also known as complex regional pain syndrome type 1, can be immensely difficult to tolerate. Because the pain caused by the condition does not have a treatable root, those suffering RSD must deal with chronic and intense pain. This can seem like an impossible and torturous way to live life--and thus, it is incredibly important for those suffering from RSD to develop ways to manage their pain. Throughout the year, we have discussed several different activities with which sufferers of RSD have come up to help cope, including going to support groups and creating awareness walks. Now, with the disease gaining more awareness, stories of those afflicted with the disease and how they have managed to cope with their pain have become more widespread.

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November 27, 2014

Cerebral Palsy: Making Home Adjustments for Children with CP

When a child has cerebral palsy, some of his needs may not be met by the average home. Often, home modifications must be made to accommodate children with cerebral palsy so that they may live safely and comfortably. According to the website for United Cerebral Palsy, these adjustments can include a wide variety of changes, "from something as simple as replacing cabinet doorknobs with pull handles to full-scale construction projects that require installing wheelchair ramps and widening doorways." These projects can also prove difficult, costly, or both; as such, this post provides links to some resources that families seeking to modify their homes for children with cerebral palsy may find useful.

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November 18, 2014

The Differing Effects of Brain Injuries on the Male and Female Brain

TIME Magazine recently published an article, written by Alexandra Sifferlin, detailing how concussions can affect girls differently than boys. Traumatic brain injuries, which occur when one sustains a violent blow to the head or body that causes damage to the brain, affect approximately 2.5 million people every year. Over half of these people are boys, but when girls sustain traumatic brain injuries, they are affected in a different way.

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November 14, 2014

Coping with Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Through Support Groups

Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), also known as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), can be difficult to cope with not only physically, but also mentally, for those suffering from RSD may feel that no one else is able to understand what they are going through. However, support and awareness groups exist to aid those suffering from RSD in this regard, and they are making great strides to raise awareness and research.

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November 12, 2014

World Cerebral Palsy Day: An Overview

October 1, 2014 was World Cerebral Palsy Day, which its official website describes as "a global innovation project to change the world for people living with cerebral palsy and their families" that is "designed to gather ideas from people around the world and make the best of those ideas a reality." The World Cerebral Palsy Alliance, which has gathered support from over 45 countries, invited people with cerebral palsy, as well as their friends and families, to submit ideas through a one-minute video or text (i.e., it takes the reader less than one minute to read the text in full) presentation of something that would "change the worlds" of those with cerebral palsy.

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November 8, 2014

Traumatic Brain Injuries on the Rise

Typically, when we discuss traumatic brain injuries on this website, we do so in the context of automobile accidents, falls, and the like. However, an article posted on Outside Magazine's website makes a revelation that, while initially startling, is not all that surprising upon second look. Traumatic brain injuries are on the rise these days, but not because more people are being hit by cars or getting into car accidents--rather, traumatic brain injuries are increasing dramatically because, as Marc Peruzzi writes in his article, "our behavior has changed."

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November 5, 2014

Cerebral Palsy: Quality of Life for Adolescents and Young Adults

Although cerebral palsy, a condition stemming from injuries that occur to a child's brain while in the womb or at birth, undoubtedly alters the lifestyles of children who have it, it does not entail a poor quality of life. Many aids exist to help those with cerebral palsy live healthy, happy lives, and this extends well outside of childhood.

A recent study released by Allan Colver, professor of community child health at Newcastle University in England, shows that adolescents afflicted with cerebral palsy have a similar quality of life to those who are the same age and do not suffer from the disorder, according to AL.com. The study consisted of a questionnaire that was given to over 400 adolescents between the ages of thirteen and seventeen with cerebral palsy, asking about areas such as physical well-being and relationships with friends. The same questionnaires were also given to children without cerebral palsy.

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